WHAT ARE STRONG MAGNETS?

Strong magnets are typically made of rare earth materials like neodymium, samarium-cobalt, or Dyfe. These materials have the unique ability to generate powerful magnetic fields, making them stand out in the world of magnets.

They play a crucial role in various applications, making our daily lives more efficient and convenient. Such as magnetic fasteners, electric motors, medical imaging, magnetic separation, magnetic levitation and renewable energy etc.

are magnets recyclable

HOW TO DISPOSE OF STRONG MAGNETS?

As the use of strong magnets becomes increasingly common in various products, more and more people are coming into contact with products that contain magnets, especially in a variety of electronic devices. As these products wear out, how to properly dispose of the magnets within them has become a growing concern for people.

Disposal Considerations:

  1. Preferred options for disposal are recycling, contact a licensed professional waste disposal service to dispose of magnet material.
  2. Disposal must be in accordance with applicable federal, state/provincial and local law and regulations if any.
  3. Large, powerful magnets may be demagnetized with high temperatures before disposal to prevent possible handling injury.
  4. Alternatively, all strong permanent magnets should be placed in a steel container prior to disposal so the magnets do not attract waste disposal equipment or refuse containers.
  5. Avoid cutting or smashing magnet as sparks thereof may cause fire in the inflammable atmosphere.
  6. Store damaged or broken magnets in a secure area away from areas where children might find them.

ARE MAGNETS RECYCLABLE?

The answer is of course yes. It is well known that the recycling of scrap metal has a long history. Magnets are also metal products and therefore can be recycled.

But magnet recycling is different from ordinary metal. Magnets are mostly made of various rare earth materials. For the recycling of magnets, the main consideration is to recycle the different rare earth metals.

Prior to 2010, the recycling of rare earths could be said to be very rare. Only pre-consumer sources of recycled rare earths exist within the magnet industry, i.e. scrap from the production of permanent magnets. And there is very, very little post-consumer recycling of rare earth-containing products.

WHY IS RARE EARTH METAL RECYCLING BECOMING MORE POPULAR?

Rare earths are essential materials for industrial production. However, the rare earth resources on the earth are limited, and the mining process will damage the environment. Therefore, in order to alleviate supply risks and reduce environmental load, recycling is one of the most effective actions. The more representative ones are: Germany mainly recycles rare earth metals from scrapped electronic products such as magnets, scrapped vehicles, scrapped computers; Japan mainly recycles rare earth metals from scrapped electrical appliances; France mainly recycles rare earth metals from scrapped fluorescent materials Metal.

  1. Rare earth demand increases every year
  2. Rare earth magnets become more expensive
  3. Rare earth resources are non-renewable resources
  4. Scientific research institutions join R&D on recycling technology
  5. Recycling can reduce the burden of rare earth waste on the environment
  6. Governments encourage the development of the rare earth recycling industry.
  7. Apple took the lead in using recycled rare earths, which increased the market’s acceptance of recycled materials and also promoted industry leading companies to actively layout of recycling business.

RECYCLED RARE EARTHS VS RAW ORE RARE EARTHS

Since recycled rare earth elements are recovered and refined from NdFeB recycled materials, they are more environmentally friendly, but the price is the same as rare earth oxides separated and smelted from rare earth raw ores. Although the price is the same, in theory the quality of recycled rare earths is not as good as that of raw ore rare earths.

Therefore, car manufacturers will point out that rare earths produced by waste recycling are not used in electric motors. But recycled rare earths are no problem for other common applications, and Apple is a typical example. You can read more from Apple expands the use of recycled materials across its products.

RARE EARTH RECYCLING SOURCES

The sources of rare earth metal recycling can be summarized as follows:

  1. Final scrap products – lamps, batteries, fluorescent materials and electronic waste;
  2. Waste materials in the industrial production process – mainly include manufacturing waste materials or residues, such as magnet manufacturing waste materials or sludge generated during grinding and molding;
  3. Industrial solid and liquid waste containing rare earth elements – phosphogypsum, red mud, tailings, metallurgical slag, ash and slag from thermal power plants and incineration plants.

WHAT ARE THE CHALLENGES TO RECYCLING RARE-EARTH METALS?

Well, first off, most rare earth metals are used in small quantities in final products, and it’s a real hassle to collect, extract, and recycle them from discarded products. This makes rare earth element recycling a bit tricky.

Then, there’s the complexity and high costs involved in the recycling process itself. The rare earth recycling industry really needs to keep pushing on in terms of technological advancements, environmental protection, and market regulation to tackle these challenges and make sure the industry can keep going sustainably.

And thirdly, the fluctuating prices in the global rare earth market can also throw a spanner in the works for recycling. Changes in supply and demand, as well as international political factors, can lead to price fluctuations, which pose a challenge to the stable operation of recycling businesses.

    ASK FOR HELP!